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Mungo: the man who laughs

Mungo: the man who laughs

MacCallum’s autobiography. His highwayman ancestor came to Australia to avoid the hangman. Since then there have been a number of eccentrics in the family, including Uncle D’Arcy, who married a chambermaid in a hot air balloon floating over Watsons Bay. Read More

Fear Drive My Feet

Fear Drive My Feet

In World War II Ryan was an intelligence operative behind enemy lines in New Guinea, an experience that began at the age of eighteen. This is his account of that time. The book has been in print for many decades, and is considered a classic of Australian war writing. Read More

Ruth Park’s Sydney

Ruth Park’s Sydney

This is a completely revised edition of Ruth Park’s classic guide to Sydney, intended both for residents and visitors. It contains six maps and twenty-four pages of colour photographs.
Ruth Park was one of Australia’s most popular and loved authors. Read More

Political Anecdotes

Political Anecdotes

A fascinating collection of the best and funniest stories in our political history, by writers from Watkin Tench to Don Watson. MacCallum made the selection with his normal eye for wit and human frailty, and provides an introduction. Read More

More Pig Bites Baby

More Pig Bites Baby

Sequel to the successful Pig Bites Baby, now sadly out of print, this contains further extracts from Australia’s first newspaper, the Sydney Gazette. Read More

Obscenity, Blasphemy, Sedition

Obscenity, Blasphemy, Sedition

The standard history of Australian censorship, from its glory days in the late Victorian era to the beginning of the end with the Lady Chatterley’s Lover trial of 1961. Read More

A Wealth of Women

A Wealth of Women

The first book to provide a comprehensive history of ordinary Australian women, from 1788. As well as the central narrative, there are dozens of snapshots of individuals, and mini-histories of important aspects of women’s lives such as health, fashion and cooking. Read More

The Quality of Sprawl

The Quality of Sprawl

A collection of Les Murray’s thoughts in prose, loosely focused on Australia and Australians. Also includes two of his best-loved poems on these subjects, ‘The Dream of Wearing Shorts Forever’ and ‘The Quality of Sprawl’. Read More

Midnight in Sicily

Midnight in Sicily

Peter Robb’s first book is a mixture of travel, history, culture and personal experience, based on the fifteen years he lived in southern Italy. It is the story of the mafia and its links to Italian politics, but it is much more. Read More

M

This is a major book about Caravaggio, one of the greatest and most influential painters the world has seen. It includes eight pages of colour plates, and twenty-four of black and white. Read More

How To Be a Megalomaniac

How To Be a Megalomaniac

This is close to the top of the list of books Michael Duffy published that should have become bestsellers but didn’t. Inspired by The Screwtape Letters by CS Lewis, it is a series of notes sent by Uncle Mungo to a fictitious nephew who begins a political career. Read More

Gum

Gum

A history of human, mainly European, encounters with the eucalypt. In this delightful account of gum trees and their champions, the people turn out to be as interesting as the trees. Read More

A Year of Slow Food

David and Gerda Foster live in Bundanoon in the Southern Highlands of NSW, where for many years they and their children were largely self-sufficient. This is the account of a year’s growing and cooking. The many splendid colour photographs are by Peter Solness. Read More

A Working Forest

A Working Forest

In the 1970s and 1980s, Les Murray published a number of major essays that effectively explained the intellectual and imaginative landscape in which his poetry is set. Once this task was completed, he largely stopped writing non-poetry, except on postcards. Read More

A Death in Brazil

A Death in Brazil

Like Robb’s first book, Midnight in Sicily, this is a mixture of travel, history, culture and personal experience. Read More

The Wooden Leg of Inspector Anders

The Wooden Leg of Inspector Anders

The acclaimed first novel in the Inspector Anders series. Anders is sent from Rome to an unnamed southern city to investigate the murder of a judge. Before long it becomes clear it is not an investigation he is likely to survive, and his superiors are well aware of this. Read More

The Guards

The Guards

The first novel in Bruen’s series about Irish ex-cop Jack Taylor. Winner of the Shamus Award.
Ken Bruen is Ireland’s best crime writer. His novels are distinguished by their brevity, pace, and dark elegance. Read More

The Eye of the Abyss

The Eye of the Abyss

Historical thriller set in Germany during World War II. A provincial bank accepts the Nazi Party as a client and its chief auditor tries unsuccessfully to save a Jewish secretary. He plots a terrible revenge on the executive responsible for her death. Read More

Pig's Blood and Other Fluids

Pig’s Blood and Other Fluids

A collection of three crime novellas: Pig’s Blood, No Sweat, and Lime Juice. Set variously in Naples, Sydney and Brazil, these are Robb’s only published fiction, and are highly regarded by connoisseurs. Read More

Inspector Anders and the Ship of Fools

Inspector Anders and the Ship of Fools

The second book in the Inspector Anders series. Having just survived the investigation in The Wooden Leg of Inspector Anders, Anders is sent to Germany for his own safety. But an investigation there exposes him to a similar level of danger. Read More

The Tasmanian Babes Fiasco

Sequel to He Died With a Felafel in His Hand. A bunch of flatmates have one week to sober up and pay the rent before disaster falls. Read More

Land Where Stories End

The Land Where Stories End

This unusual novel is a post-modern fable set in Dark Ages Ireland. It is a hardback with interesting illustrations from an alchemical source, and at the author’s request there is no writing on the cover. Read More

The Guilded Cage

The Gilded Cage

This is the first in a wonderful trilogy of historical novels that is still to find the audience it deserves. It is the story of a rich cast of characters in Melbourne in the 1880s and on to Federation, who experience the boom and then the crash, with all the excitement and tragedy of those events. Read More

The Dressmaker

Soon to be a major motion picture.
After twenty years away, Tilly Dunnage returns to Dungatar. Read More

The Burnt City

This is the second novel in Marshall Browne’s wonderful trilogy about Melbourne towards the end of the nineteenth century. Read More

Summer at Mount Hope

Pride and Prejudice set in the Victorian wheat belt of the 1890s. Phoeba Crupp is a gal of inconveniently independent tendencies, to the concern of her mother and her sisters although not of her father, whose mind is on his vineyard – regarded with deep suspicion by the neighbouring graziers. Read More

He Died With a Felafel in His Hand

By 1996 John Birmingham had lived with 89 people and kept notes on all of them. In six weeks he cooked up this shared house memoir laced with a dash of fiction. The exact nature of the recipe remains a secret, but the result put food and drink on the young Birmingham’s table. Read More